Restaurants In Les Gets

By |2019-10-16T08:36:50+00:00July 16th, 2019|

Les Gets delivers when it comes to dining experiences. From restaurants offering fine dining with a passionate connection to regional and traditional heritage, to modern, simplistic affairs; from the simple street food of K2, or the local butcher who cooks up handmade regional sausages for mid-ski-day food on the go, to authentic Tapas in the wine bars of The Marmotte, or fine dining at the likes of La Péla. Then there are the old mountaintop classics, such as La Paika and Chez Nannon, who create uncomplicated purist mountain food, respecting the seasons, sourcing the finest local ingredients, staying true to their mountain roots. In fact the region as a whole has in recent years experienced somewhat of a gastronomic renaissance as a wide range of talented and creative chefs, with diverse roots and pasts, choose to live and work in the region.

LA PÉLA

La Péla is one of the most popular restaurants in Les Gets and is set in an old Savoyard farm in the centre of the village. With an authentic yet modern alpine interior and a wonderful warm atmosphere the restaurant offers a fine selection of traditional Savoyard cuisine. A “péla” is actually a traditional word for tartiflette and there several variations of it on the menu. There are also Savoyard cheese and meat dishes and a selection of fish dishes such as their ‘Le filet St. Pierre’. Ask for a table close to the open fire and always leave space for dessert—their Café Gourmand never fails to impress!

LA BISKATCHA

La Biskatcha is a brasserie and grill in the centre of Les Gets making up one of the three restaurants in the La Marmotte chalet-hotel. The Hotel itself has been part of the Mirigay Family since 1947, welcoming guests from all over the world, and La Biskatcha is the Mirigay family’s dining alternative to the many regional Savoyard menus in town. The restaurant, along with the adjoining tapas bar, L’Anka, boasts colourful and casual décor and serves up traditional, high-quality dishes such as grilled meats and tapas, and more exotic options, many of which are cooked on their authentic wood-fired barbecue. The tapas menu changes with the seasons and their wine list is wonderful, offering a great selection of local and world wines. L’Anka is also great for a pre-dinner aperitif if you just fancy popping in for a drink.

LA FRUITIÈRE DES PERRIÈRES

At the far end of Les Gets (very close to our chalet Ferme de Moudon) sits La Fruitière des Perrières. This is the local restaurant attached to the local Fromagerie (cheese maker) and it is a must visit in the day to watch the local cheese making process and sample local cheeses. But in the evening, you can experience their produce in a very authentic setting. On arrival you are seated at a communal dining table by an open fire and presented with an aperitif, Le Marquisette (white rum, grenadine, white wine, oranges and lemons). The menu, focusing around local produce, offers soups, stews and of course, incredible fondues. Here they use the traditional mix of swiss gruyère, comté fruité and vacherin fribourgeois served with a platter of local charcuterie, potatoes, pickles and salad. The mushroom (cep) fondue is also worth a try. Rustic, authentic and wholly alpine. We highly recommend.

LA PAIKA

On piste, Perrières

La Paika is without question one of the best and most popular restaurants in the entire region. It features heavily in any resort guide, press review or Michelin guide recommendation. Come winter or summer, for incredible mountain dining, drinks, mountain BBQs, the best views, you name it, they do it and they are the best. Find it on the slopes down to Perrières, set in a renovated alpage building. It offers a wonderful warm atmosphere and delicious food. In spring their chefs cook on huge flaming grills outdoors. There’s a great wine list and as you walk in the front door you will pass two tables worth of the freshest most delicious homemade, fresh baked, cakes of every kind. One of our favourite lunch spots. Take a table on the sunny terrace and let the afternoon unwind.

LE VAFFIEU

On piste, Les Gets-Pleney

Le Vaffieu is a traditional Savoyard style chalet-restaurant located walking or skiing distance from the top of the Pleney cable car. With an interior dining area full of traditional exposed wooden beams and alpine paraphernalia, and a large heated indoor/outdoor terrace, you would be forgiven for turning up without a reservation. But this sunny mountain restaurant is a favourite for locals and tourists alike. The delicious regional fare is perfect after a morning skiing, as is the fine red wine. Their ‘croûte’ is the best on the mountain but if cheese is not your thing then their lamb cutlets are amazing as is the seabass. On a sunny day reserve a table on the terrace but in the depths of winter try and get the table closest to the bar where you can listen to the owners and locals in high-octane conversation as they work.

CHEZ NANNON

On piste, Nyon

Chez Nannon is the mountain refuge we think we want to hike to, but probably never will. Thankfully this mountain restaurant is accessible from the Ravarettes or the Troncs Express chairlifts so it just requires you to gently slide. As you approach the quaint wooden structure (that can be partially hidden on a truly snowy winter) you will be greeted with the scent of bubbling pans of Reblochon cheese and a plume of smoke dancing up from the chalet chimney. This is classic Savoyard mountain dining of the highest order and inside it feels more like a mountain hut with small windows, cosy wooden furniture and the same family working the kitchen every year. They might be busy but they will feed you well. Chez Nannon is famous for its Tartiflette (Reblochon cheese, potatoes, lardons a large side salad served with chunks of fresh bread) which is served in a bubbling pan to your table. The Cote de Boeuf and cheesy potatoes are also a good option, as are the steaks and the burgers. Book ahead to ensure you are not disappointed. We recommend reserving a table inside in either of the furthest corners to avoid the incoming and leaving foot traffic.

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